Career Readiness Archives | Imarticus

BTVI Rising Star post Mr. Barshikar’s Interview on Friday

Watch Nikhil Barshikar, Founder & MD, Imarticus Learning on the Rising Star show where he talks about the Imarticus’ concept, growth, funding, employees, technology and its business model.

Visit to view the video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3M_KG_S7wz8

Crack That Next Interview

Experts share tips to help you in meetings with potential employers.

You thought you had done fairly well at the interview and had good recommendations from your previous employer, but you still did not get the job. What went wrong—was it something you said or did not say?

Professionals say many recruiters take calls on the basis of how a particular candidate behaves or talks. It may not be possible to outline all your capabilities in a 20-minute interview but you can use these tips from professionals on how to ace one.

Do your homework

While most candidates research what the role demands, not many people read up about the company itself. “Knowing about the company is a big positive. It shows that you are interested and committed to the job, and believe in the company’s goal. Read the company’s annual reports, see what the chief operating officer or managing director is talking about. If there are pieces published, or if they are giving talks, read up on them,” says Amogh Deshmukh, managing director, Development Dimensions International (DDI) India, a talent management consulting firm.

Also, find out about the interview team or panel. “I see more people from the younger generation trying to find out who the interviewer might be. And they are not afraid to ask questions either. Usually, people on the interview panel have LinkedIn profiles that candidates can go through. This can help you prepare yourself about the kind of expertise he/she is looking for,” says Kinjal Choudhary, head of human resources (HR), VE Commercial Vehicles (VECV), a joint venture between Volvo Group and Eicher Motors.

Carry an updated résumé

A résumé which does not have the correct and updated facts does not leave a good impression. Make sure it has the correct details of your last job, dates, responsibilities, etc. It is also a good idea to carry a copy of the résumé with you, even if the interviewer is likely to already have it.

Grooming is important

This seems like a no-brainer, but grooming is important, especially for senior roles. Do a quick check to get a sense of how to dress—the recruiter you have been in touch with can answer questions about the company’s dress culture, such as if the work attire is formal or semi-formal.

“No matter what type of company, it’s key for a candidate to look well put together. Even if it’s a start-up, opt for a semi-casual look. Make sure you are well groomed and comfortable in what you wear,” says Tia Paranjape, associate director, The StyleCracker Project, an online personalized fashion styling platform. She says women should opt for a muted colour palette, minimalistic accessories, and natural make-up. “Also, choose a suitable heel size and shoe that is both comfortable yet classy,” Paranjpe says.

Men should go for well-fitted formal shirts and trousers, with polished shoes. “A blazer and a tie is highly recommended for leadership interviews. And, of course, well-groomed hair and a light cologne,” says Rituparna Chakraborty, co-founder and executive vice-president of staffing company TeamLease.

If you are asked to elaborate on how you are a team player or what your leadership skills are, try to give specific examples instead of exaggerating

Answer the tough questions

Almost every interview has questions like, where do you see yourself in five years; tell me about a mistake you have made; or your weakness, etc. Prepare for such questions instead of avoiding them or trying to think on the spot. “Answering these questions shows your humility and also shows that you are self-aware. You have made a mistake, which is only human, then you have analysed it. And you will not repeat the same thing again,” says Dimple Jha, talent acquisition lead at Sapient Razorfish, an agency providing technology services and marketing consultancy to brands.

Be specific

A good interviewer will always probe for answers, so don’t blabber or try to sound overconfident. If you are asked to elaborate on how you are a team player or what your leadership skills are, try to give specific examples instead of exaggerating. “A lot of people we interview give answers they have almost memorized, or asked their friends and copied. It does not work like that. We need to hear examples of a situation where you showed your leadership quality, for example,” says Deshmukh.

Many professionals also follow something known as the STAR (or situation-timeline-action taken-result) format. Choudhary says it would be a good idea to “give a real example, even if it is a hypothetical question. For example, if you are asked to imagine a crisis situation, you can respond by giving an example of how you reacted in an actual crisis”.

Disagree, but logically

There may be times when you don’t agree with what the interviewer says. While it does not make sense to agree just because an offer is at stake, be respectful. “If you disagree with something, give reasons for it. Pay attention to what the interviewer is saying and do not cut him/her off in between. Showing respect for others is the least you can do during an interview,” says Choudhary.

Sonia Puar, assistant professor (clinical psychology) at Amity University in Noida, adjoining Delhi, says candidates must also work on their body language since interviewers pick up on non-verbal cues quickly. If you start fidgeting and playing with any object around you, a pen or your hair, etc., it shows that you are nervous. It’s important to show them that you are in control of your emotions. Be friendly but serious, advises Puar.

Ask questions

While it may seem like you should be the one answering questions, it’s important to be asking your interviewer questions as well. This shows that you are both engaged and interested in the organization and the role.

Go in prepared, say experts. “Frame some questions for the interviewer. You can ask about the growth prospects of your role, or about the benefits the organization gives, about work-life balance, or about mobility (the prospect of moving cities with the same role),” says Jha.

Some questions may be premature—candidates should steer clear of those. Enquiring about the compensation package at the first stage of the interview is not a good idea, says Chandrasekhar Sripada, clinical full professor (organizational behaviour and strategic human capital) at the Indian School of Business (ISB), Hyderabad.

Prof. Sripada says: “Rumour-based questions are also a deal-breaker. For example, if you say you have heard from someone that the company has been firing a lot of people and ask for the reason, it might not come across well. However, if you say you have seen on Glassdoor that the company’s negative feedback is about a high attrition rate or the company being bureaucratic, you can ask them to comment. How you frame your statement will make a lot of difference.”

Follow up

You should follow up after an interview rather than leaving it to the company to get back. Those who do, tend to overdo it. Find a balance. “Maybe share an article about a topic you discussed during the interview. Try to build recall, instead of sounding desperate. It is okay to ask for the interviewer’s phone number, email or, at the very least, LinkedIn profile. Irrespective of the outcome, it might be a good idea to be in touch,” explains Chakraborty.

Chances are you will face questions similar to the ones in previous interviews. But you still need to prepare well. The basic hygiene factors, the questions you ask and the way you answer are all going to make or break that next interview

Source: livemint.com

Deciding What To Read Next?

good-reads-blog

You’re in the right place.  If you enjoy reading about Finance.

“IMARTICUS GOOD READS”

w06DISRUPT YOURSELF: PUTTING THE POWER OF DISRUPTIVE INNOVATION TO WORK 

Author : Whitney Johnson

Johnson, a Merrill Lynch equity analyst turned entrepreneur, shows how and why to upend a career in this practical, concise book. Savvy and often counter-intuitive, this book offers the tools, mind-set guidance, and rationale for avoiding complacency and embracing a new career path. Consider this your playbook for personal and professional innovation. Are you ready to jump?

THE ART OF DISTRESSED M&A: BUYING, SELLING, AND FINANCING TROUBLED AND INSOLVENT COMPANIES51nszETHAiL._SX312_BO1,204,203,200_

Author : H. Peter Nesvold and Jeffrey Anapolsky

Opportunities abound in “bankruptcy beauties”―both in good times and bad. The Art of Distressed M&A provides the information needed to manage the unique complexities of buying, selling, and financing troubled companies. The book also highlights practical examples using recent bankruptcy cases following the Bankruptcy Abuse Prevention and Consumer Protection Act of 2005 and is the first publication of its kind since the Dodd–Frank Act of 2010.

 

paul-mason-yanis-varoufakis-the-global-minotaur-833-body-image-1436179692
THE GLOBAL MINOTAUR

Author : Yanis Varoufakis

In this remarkable and provocative book, Yanis Varoufakis, former finance minister of Greece, explodes the myth that ineffective regulation of banks, greed and globalization were at the heart of both the Eurozone crisis and the global economic crisis. Rather, he makes the case that they are mere symptoms of a much deeper malaise, traceable to the Great Crash of 1929, then on through to the 1970s: the time when a Global Minotaur was born.

 

good

GOOD TO GREAT: WHY SOME COMPANIES MAKE THE LEAP… AND OTHERS DON’T

Author : Jim Collins

Good to Great introduces readers to the concept of an enduring great company, one that sustains tremendous growth for at least 15 years from the so called “turning point”. Published in 2001, the book offers a well-reasoned road map to excellence for any organization and gives a great opportunity to analyze how much endurance there is in a great enduring company.

 

{4DDF4F18-24F2-4FA3-B70C-B272A153E476}Img400THE BOOK OF AWAKENING: HAVING THE LIFE YOU WANT BY BEING PRESENT IN THE LIFE YOU HAVE

Author : Mark Nepo

A daily guide for authentic living in hard times, The Book of Awakening is a beautiful and poetic book to keep your head high, your heart open and your feet on the ground. A year’s supply of wise and shining thoughts to be taken, one a day, like vitamins for the soul. Highly recommended by Oprah Winfrey and one of her Ultimate Favourite Things.

 

Five Phrases To Avoid During An Interview

In this series, we at Imarticus Learning give you tips and tricks to land your dream job in Investment Banking.

There are many situations in which people make the mistake of using informal, irresponsible and fairly inappropriate phrases during an interview. These small mistakes may cost you your career. Let’s have a look at most unhelpful phrases to avoid in front of a recruiter.

“To be honest with you”

When job candidates use this phrase, it sends a mixed message. It can sound like you are are being honest now, but weren’t being honest before. It’s a good idea to leave this phrase out.

“I can’t think of any real weaknesses”

It may be exhausting when an interviewer asks, “What are your weaknesses?” But that’s all the more reason for you to have an answer. If you’re caught off guard by one of the most well-known interview questions around, you’ll look unprepared, come across like you lack self-awareness and give the impression of one unwilling to have an honest discussion about whether or not you’re fit for the job. No matter how highly you think of yourself, there should still be plenty of things that you’d like to do better.

“I don’t have any questions”

You might be spending eight hours a day (or more) in this job, at this company, with this manager and there’s nothing you’re wondering about? Interviewers want to know that you’re interested in the details of the job, the department in which you’ll be working, your prospective supervisor’s management style, and the culture of the organization. Otherwise, you’re signaling that you’re either not that interested or that you just haven’t thought much about it. So come prepared with thoughtful, intelligent questions about the work you’d be doing.

“I think I can do this job”

Saying “I think” instead of “I know” or “I believe” subtly communicates a lack of confidence. So many job candidates are uncomfortable talking about themselves. Most people are afraid of being seen as bragging and that can keep them from sounding confident when they may be a perfect fit for the job.

“I will try”

The word “try” really doesn’t convey meaning, especially when a potential employer inquires about your ability to do something, such as “Can you implement a new cost sheet format for the department?” If your answer is, “I will try,” you don’t sound confident. More importantly, the word ‘try’ sounds like you are setting yourself up to fail. Answer yes or no.

-Team Imarticus Learning

Imarticus Learning Reviews – Students Experience

Imarticus Learning owes its existence to Mr. Nikhil Barshikar’s (M.D –Imarticus Learning) vision of providing trained technical personnel of international class who would act as leaders in the Banking, Analytics & technology space globally.

Imarticus has been in existence since the last 2 years, and is going strong. With a vision to bring positive changes in aspirants’ lives, we have successfully trained and placed thousands of students within their desired career paths.

As a Student Relationship Manager and a Counselor at Imarticus, it’s a delight to hear what the students feel about the change we brought into their lives. Here are a few reviews given by our students.

Balbir S : Staff is wonderful. Tremendously supportive. I would like to thanks them from the bottom of my heart. While at interview the confidence developed in me by Imarticus was most satisfying. Selected or not i knew i had given my best with confidence. The knowledge and HR training gained was the main reason. Just want to thank Imarticus for every thing.

Jinesh D:  Experience was great, with regards to knowledge, what we learnt we are applying. The knowledge we gained was in depth.

Amit S: It has been an amazing learning experience. Orking on live projects and following guidelines set by major companies while implementing these projects have definitely been one of the major points of this course. Thank you imarticus.

Amita S: Being in Imarticus was a great experience nice exposure to the finance domain. Learning process actually transforms your personality and train you for the corporate world.

Viraj K: It was a great time in Imarticus with high quality professors. It was great here, learning Java, Advanced Java, Communication Skills and the most important Investment Banking. Geeting an awesome knowledge about IB was superb here. Love to be in Imarticus.

Sudarshan B: If you really want to learn the concept of Investment Banking then Imarticus is the place to be. The kind of knowledge that you obtained by the end of the course takes you to a different level all together. With practical learning you are also groomed so as to be readily accepted by the industry. One also gets opportunity to interact with distinguished industry people thanks to our super faculty you are well taken care of

Olson P : The knowledge has help me a lot. Helping me to know more in depth due Imarticus input.

We sincerely thank all the students for taking their time out to send us a note of appreciation. This just motivates us to continue spreading the joy of pursuing aspirations.

 

-Sohail Merchant

Student Relations Manager

Imarticus Learning

Leadership- An Important Organizational Aspect

It has been said that a  “a good leader can make a success of a weak business while a poor leadership ruins even the best plan”. That is why developing effective leadership is considered as a key differentiating factor and critical to  the overall performance of the organization.

Companies operating in today’s competitive marketplace understand the importance of leadership effectiveness for growth and development of business. Different leadership development and training programs have been initiated with the motive to form, maintain, and transform the true identity of a business leader. Consistent talent management programs are being organized at all levels across the organizations in order to identify qualified candidates to fill current and future leadership roles.

Leadership is the combination of action and knowledge. Leaders are known for making decisions, which can increase shareholder value, attract and retain a competitive workforce and maximize the use of resources.

Developing an effective leadership style requires deliberate practice. It can be conceptualized through detailed performance model baseds on the organizational need. Imarticus offers leadership development programs, which involve continuous training, assessment and feedback in order to develop the effective leadership skills to cater to different job roles.

Alumni Catch Up – A Chat with Ami T, Alumni of IFAP

One of the many reasons students attend an Imarticus course is to change the course of their career. Take Ami  for instance. She came to us with a Masters in Engineering having never worked in finance and left us with a job with Gravitas, a leading financial services firm focused on the research. It’s not easy and entails a lot of work but Ami was extremely focused. She constantly engaged with faculty to ensure proper learning. Ami’s success proves that there’s nothing to beat a combination of hard work, ambition and the right course. It’s been about six months or so now and we caught up with Ami and had a quick chat on how she was doing.

1. Tell us something about what you do now? What does your new job entail?

“I work as a credit research analyst at Gravitas Technology Pvt Ltd, which is one of the leading service providers to the alternative investment industry. My new job entails building and maintaining financial models from a credit perspective and drafting my research findings and observations for credit focused clients.”

2. What do you enjoy most about your new job?

“Since I am doing project-based assignments for the clients at Gravitas, I get to analyze a variety of public and private companies of various sizes and sectors.”

3. Walk us through a normal day at Gravitas?

“A normal day at Gravitas would involve a typical credit analysis of a company which would include:

• Industry analysis, company analysis, Key ratio analysis, Fundamental credit analysis (e.g. making a capital structure table, leverage analysis), Writing about the Credit outlook of the company

If available, I also read the company reports published by the top credit rating agencies like Moodys, S&P, Fitch as I get to understand their methodology in assigning a particular credit rating to the company. I also read initiating coverage reports of public companies as it helps me better understand the company’s business and the risks involved.”

4. What was your favorite subject at Imarticus and why?

“My favorite subject at Imarticus was Equity Research. We got started by learning the basics of equity research, the different types of equity research reports, how to analyze an industry and company, financial analysis and finally writing an equity research report. This helped me tremendously even in my role as a credit research analyst as it taught me financial statement analysis and also basics of industry and company analysis.”

5. How has Imarticus contributed to you in your new role? Which subjects have been most useful?

“I would give most of the credit in my new role to Imarticus for aiding a non-finance graduate, like myself, to secure a job as a credit research analyst in about 4 months. They started by teaching accounting basics, learning about company valuation, writing an initiating coverage report and delivering a M&A pitch presentation, all in a matter of months. All subjects in the IFAP course have helped me in my career so far in some way or the other-so it is hard to pick out a subject which hasn’t been useful. The curriculum is well designed for any new person who is venturing into the world of finance.”

6. How do you relax?

“I unwind by meeting my friends or by spending quality time with my family over the weekend.”

7. Any resolutions for 2015?

•” To successfully clear the CFA Level 1 examination in June 2015

• To further my skills in financial analysis

• To have a healthy, fun-filled year”

8. What advice would you give to current students in the IFAP program?

“I would advise them the following:

Take advantage of the resources at Imarticus (e.g. Experienced faculty, training in soft skills)

• Don’t procrastinate and rely on the class lectures alone to ace the course. Since this is a short course, it will involve a lot of self-study from your side

• Don’t be afraid to ask questions”

If you are interested in making a lateral career shift to financial services, please come talk to us at Imarticus Learning. We offer free counseling sessions.

5 Phrases to Avoid During An Interview

In this series, we at Imarticus Learning give you tips and tricks to land your dream job in Investment Banking.

There are many situations in which people make the mistake of using informal, irresponsible and fairly inappropriate phrases during an interview. These small mistakes may cost you your career. Let’s have a look at most unhelpful phrases to avoid  in front of a recruiter.

-“To be honest with you”

When job candidates use this phrase, it sends a mixed message. It can sound like you are are being honest now, but weren’t being honest before. It’s a good idea to leave this phrase out.

-“I can’t think of any real weaknesses”

It may be exhausting when an interviewer asks, “What are your weaknesses?” But that’s all the more reason for you to have an answer. If you’re caught off guard by one of the most well-known interview questions around, you’ll look unprepared, come across like you lack self-awareness and give the impression of one unwilling to have an honest discussion about whether or not you’re fit for the job. No matter how highly you think of yourself, there should still be plenty of things that you’d like to do better.

-“I don’t have any questions”

You might be spending eight hours a day (or more) in this job, at this company, with this manager and there’s nothing you’re wondering about? Interviewers want to know that you’re interested in the details of the job, the department in which you’ll be working, your prospective supervisor’s management style, and the culture of the organization. Otherwise, you’re signaling that you’re either not that interested or that you just haven’t thought much about it. So come prepared with thoughtful, intelligent questions about the work you’d be doing.

-“I think I can do this job”

Saying “I think” instead of “I know” or “I believe” subtly communicates a lack of confidence. So many job candidates are uncomfortable talking about themselves. Most people are afraid of being seen as bragging and that can keep them from sounding confident when they may be a perfect fit for the job.

-“I will try”

The word “try” really doesn’t convey meaning, especially when a potential employer inquires about your ability to do something, such as “Can you implement a new cost sheet format for the department?”  If your answer is, “I will try,” you don’t sound confident. More importantly, the word ‘try’ sounds like you are setting yourself up to fail. Answer yes or no.

-Team Imarticus Learning

Imarticus Good Reads

 

Deciding what to read next?

You’re in the right place. If you enjoy reading about Investment Banking, we’ll give you surprisingly insightful recommendations. These are some thriller, suspense and romance genre books with stories revolving around investment banking. Go through a quick synopsis and tell us if you find them interesting enough….

 

Den of Thieves

A riveting account of the biggest insider-trading scandal in financial history that nearly destroyed Wall Street, the men who pulled it off, and the chase that finally brought them to justice.

 

Tipping Point

Malcolm Gladwell makes his case that problems are as volatile as epidemics and are capable of dramatic change in direction with the right intervention – the Tipping Point. If you are a fan of data, numbers and like logical interpretations of phenomenon, this is definitely a book for you.

 

Flash Boys

In this book, Michael Lewis investigates big banks, the world’s stock exchanges, and high-frequency trading as they have never been investigated, and exposes the many strange new ways that Wall Street generates profits.

 

Fade into Red

This debut novel – which is equal part travelogue and chick-lit, tells the tale of protagonist Ayra as she juggles investment banking and the Tuscan countryside, board-rooms and vineyards, following her passion but tempered by pragmatism.

 

Shadow Account

A Finance/Suspense thriller pits a young Wall Street player against corporate conspiracy and White House intrigue. Welcome to the murky world where finance meets felony, money meets mortality, and profit and loss are matters of life and death.

 

-by Sohail Merchant (Team Imarticus)

What Hobbies Should I Put in My CV?

During the last Imarticus Interview Prep sessions, a student asked me a question- ‘What hobbies should I put in my CV?’ He was distraught because he had put tennis as his hobby and had been unable to answer who won the last French Open. He didn’t get the job and wonders if this could have been the problem because everything else had gone so well. Hobbies are tricky- not putting in any makes you look like a bore yet putting down something you know little about can ruin your chances of a getting a job, primarily because everything else in your resume will be questioned as well. So what’s to be done?

First let’s look at why we put the troublesome section in there at all. The ‘vitae’ curriculum vitae stands for life and this section, to some extent, gives you an opportunity to show that you have a life outside work. It helps an employer see that you can fit into various social situations, that you understand winning and losing or creating something from scratch. A sports enthusiast comes across as both competitive and a team player especially if he/she is part of a local club. Hobbies are even more critical in client service businesses where relationships need to be fostered. It’s not for nothing they say that golfing is the networking game. But you can’t put ‘Golfing’ in just because you spent an afternoon at the driving range with your uncle.

The reality of the matter is few of us have real hobbies. We spend far too much time working or surfing the Internet and spending time on social media. Time that would have otherwise been spent with a book, a musical instrument or even sport is spent navigating traffic or checking Facebook. So what do we do? We make things up, things that most people say; reading, watching movies and sometimes even jogging. So many interviews go like this? Students make the mistake of putting in cricket and get stuck when they’re asked whom they play for, where they play and when they last hit the ball. They usually follow up with – ‘I prefer watching Sir.’ The next question is- Tell me something about your favorite bowler and why? The end. Everyone watches cricket, not everyone knows everything about the game. Here are some pointers on how to handle the hobbies section:

  • Stay away from general hobbies like ‘Reading’, ‘Watching movies’ unless you really know your stuff. Do not say ‘Reading’ unless you are a voracious reader, who can hold his or her own in a conversation. This means reading at least one book a week and talking about favorite authors or genres. The same goes with movies.
  • Be specific- If you do play football regularly, provide detail. Instead of just saying ‘Football’, say ‘Play football on the weekends with local club or goalie with local club.’ ‘Play the Guitar’ can be ‘ part of a small band’ because it’s quite likely that if you are a real enthusiast, you’ll have a lot more to say. If you are a history buff, try ‘Enjoy reading about Indian Independence or the partition’. This sets your resume apart
  • Don’t list your hobbies- the more you list, the more you belittle what you do. It also makes the interviewer wonder how hard you can really work.
  • Tailor the section to the job you are looking for- many JD’s prescribe specific traits they like, so choose the hobby that works best for that. Analytical could mean ‘Crosswords’ or ‘Chess’. Again, only choose one you actually practice.